Running a business can be daunting. But imagine if you could rope your whole family into it… Great news, this transcript is all about how easy it is to get creating business opportunities by delegating stuff to your kids!

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Episode 102 with Jonathan and Renee Harris from Parent Their Passion

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Who are Jonathan and Renee and what is “Parent their Passion”?

Renee and Jonathan Harris run “Parent their Passion”

Jonathan and Renee Harris run www.parenttheirpassion.com, a website that teaches parents how they can go about creating business opportunities.

They do this by helping to identify and develop your 12-16 year old's talents and interests to create something remarkable, and marketable.

They have 9 kids themselves and a selection of them have gone on to run their own businesses.

The proof of the pudding as they say!


Read the transcript

You’ll learn:

· Who are Jonathan and Renee and what is “Parent their Passion”? (01m20s)

· Family struggles and avoiding the move (05m29s)

· Working the marketplace (08m30s)

· Nurturing children to win in business (18m28s)

· How do they choose (what to do)? (31m00s)

Wendy

I'm joined by Renee and Jonathan Harris and we're going to be covering a hot topic from 2020 and that is homeschooling. So what on earth has homeschooling got to do with business, Wendywoo? Well, let me tell you, Renee and Jonathan have had a different approach to homeschooling for many years and the way that they have involved the whole family has led to them making conversations about creating business opportunities count.

Renee

From the beginning we wanted to homeschool. We did know that, I should say from the beginning, from the time our kids were becoming of school ages when we discovered, oh, there's this option, let's learn about it. We talked to some other families that were homeschooling and found this is a good fit for us, this would be great. It was a four year old, two year old, and then we had twins and we may have had four at the time, but two that were of school age when we were talking and thinking about it. I came from a public high school background. I taught public high school, so that didn't really come into play yet. But I knew what school was like and I felt confident. Well, if I can teach high school, I could probably do this too. Turns out that has nothing, you don't need those skills. If anything, it ruins you because you have to change your mindset, you have to look at, there's more opportunities. Jonathan actually was able to work from home in a tech field as an employee, so we had no businesses going. We hadn't even considered starting a business. Along the way, my sons and I were just working on a little farmers market staff. So it was a product that I had that fixed my own skin and I thought, well, you know, this be kind of fun. There's a little farmer's market starting up. We're very community oriented and we thought this might be a fun thing for the kids and I to do together. And they were eight and ten at the time. I consider myself an introvert. To even set up a booth and try to sell something didn't seem like personality type. However, I loved it so much and my boys enjoyed it with me and it was so enriching that we went back. One is a lot more gregarious and the other is a lot more kind of behind the scenes. So I gave them different jobs but ended up just turning this is fun, and it's not like we made a ton of money, but we did a lot of trading for other goods from the other vendors and so on. But it was a very good learning experience. Fast forward to after a few months of that, we thought, well, let's take this online. Jonathan's got the tech skills. We can actually just start the little business and maybe have a little side income. This is right before, or I guess during big recession in 2008. So this is where we weren't really thinking, we need the second income. We were like, well, his company is taking away some of those privileges that we're relying on, like a cell phone and so on. And so maybe having a little bit of this extra income could be helpful, so let's just put this online and so on. And then from there, I think it was about a year later, we progressed with it online and we were making sope sales and thought this could actually help support the family a tiny bit more. Just that extra $1,000 a month is helpful, and we were able to do that online. I think when I think about a pivotal conversation that we had, jonathan and I had was about a year later, I was pregnant with number eight, and she was due the next month. His parents were out visiting us. They live in France, but they came out to stay with us once a baby being born. And Jonathan said, well, let's go on our walk. And we would take these, especially me being so pregnant, we would take walks up and down the neighborhood. And he said, I just got laid off. So this was a conversation where life could change all at one time. And we had to come home and decide, what are we going to do? Like, we have this little tiny business that's making a little bit of money on the side. We didn't want to have to move.

Jonathan

We fell in love with the community that we're in, and we're in a more semi rural part of California, so we're not near the big metro areas where you could go across town and apply different jobs. So we knew that in order for me to stay in this area with the skills that I had to be very difficult, so it would be likely I'd have to move maybe into another state. We didn't want to do that.

Renee

So we decided, let's just put our savings, let's just put all of our investment into trying to get this business to take off, because we just didn't want to have to move our whole family to the bay… for us, it would be the Bay Area.

Wendy

So what I get from that is you totally knew that you were on to something or you would not have made that risk. With the circumstances around you, you kind of knew you'd got to create this opportunity.

Renee

I think we were not completely figuring it all out yet. We didn't know how we knew it was going to be a risk. And maybe it was a little it of like, what other choice do we have?

Jonathan

Well, you know, I should say the product that she was making, which is a skincare product, which doesn't sound very exciting, but for us personally, it was because she had this very specific skin condition that she could not get resolved as far as crack skin. And she had tried every product on the marketing and it was so effective for her personally, I think that's what kind of gave that confidence. When she wasn't just selling a product, she had 100% confidence that this works. I think that covered over being shy or introverted. She knew intimately the product and so I think that's also partly what propelled it. It was something exciting personally for her. And that makes a difference.

Renee

We had a lot of kids, so we're kind of used to having going kind of against the flow or going differently than a regular path, the safe path, I guess some people could say. Because we had a lot of kids, we were used to doing things a little bit differently anyway. So that gave us like, well, let's at least try this and see where it takes us.

Wendy

And of course, because it works so well for you, Renee, that's the proof that we need, isn't it? That's what cements our conversation. Because you're speaking from the heart. You're not just trying to stick a square peg in a round hole and make something of something. It worked already. That's what we all buy into more than anything, isn't it? You can tell, can't do they mean it? Is it really going to work or not? We all have those filters, don't we?

Renee

And having the opportunity to speak face to face to people at farmers market for me was huge because I could tell the type of people that needed the product. You would think it'd be okay only women or only moms or only people who wash their hands a lot because it was a dry skin issue. But no, I would have these farmers home, these ranchers and these men, these mechanics, and they came by. They would come to our booth because they thought and my boys were giving samples, they thought it was cheese because it looked like little pieces of cheese. So these men are coming because they think it's going to be free food. But no, I have my boys show them how it works. And then we had a conversation, it's for dry skin and we explain it. But these men, I see them walking away. They've got it on their hands, they're trying it out. Then they loop around and come straight back because they want to know more about it and like, oh, this really does feel good on my skin. What is it now? They want to know more. For me to have that confidence, I can convince a 65 year old ranch or cowboy guy that would never buy a female product. It does give you some confidence, but you know that it's helping people. And I think that face to face contact at the farmers market was really helpful.

Wendy

Being in those sorts of situations. And I know I was 13 on the markets. That was my first job, so I know exactly. You're thrown into the pool of personalities. There's no hiding from any kind of characteristic that you're going to get. And having your children being able to help you as well, having their witness, their bearing witness to watching their mom get fixed by this cream, they're watching their mom's confidence grow. There's no convincing needed, because I know when I use a hand product, if it's good, I can still feel the benefits a few minutes after I've put it on.

Renee

Right? Yes.

Wendy

It feels good for about a minute, and then that feeling in your hands just disappears.

Renee

Right.

Wendy

And that's exactly what those farmers and mechanics were experiencing. And I know I've been doing a heap of gardening lately, and my hands desperately need something nourished afterwards, because you're constantly washing your hands because you're in between jobs. So I think it's fascinating. Was that what led you to seeing different traits within the children as to how they could apply themselves in business? Because I know that's sort of part of the story as well, isn't it?

Renee

Yes. In fact, what happened with that was the fact that here we are, we're changing our lifestyle. We don't have a set income to rely on every week. So a lot of it had to do with, okay, the kids are going to have to either get on board or really get used to us cutting back a lot. Their activities were going to have to take a back seat. We didn't really tend to have kids in sports and kids in ballet and kids in taekwondo and so on anyway. But we were also going to be on a very small income for a while, and they would have their activities would cut back. And then the second part of that was we saw that, wait, they have skills and interests that we can pull in, especially our oldest, because by then he was like eleven years old. So we saw a skill set in him that we could find useful for us to use in our business.

Jonathan

All of that put together, and my oldest at that time was twelve. He's now 24. Okay, 24. We're bumping into the teen years now or start coming right up on this. And of course, my own memory of my education at that age is a lot more fresher. I can remember that we're getting involved in accelerating his education at home. So we're homeschooling, and so we have a lot of freedom to do more of English or more of math, whatever we want to do. And what we wind up doing is like, why couldn't we make their education, which was important to us, be a lot more business focused in the good sense of the word, like, how is what they're learning going to help them after high school? So we around us, we had older friends. We're starting to become highly aware that the education that people were getting, good education, by the way, was not really helping them for after their formal education years, they were back to trying to figure it out. And so we're saying, why can't we do this sooner? Of course we were feeling the pain of unemployment. We could have potentially stayed in the field that I was in, but it would have required us to move around the country a lot. And we're like, no way. We want to be here in this community. We're putting down roots. Especially I want to be at home or as much as I could with the teens. And so why can't we get those kids thinking about life after formal school a lot more? And one of the ways is, why can't they help us? So she was saying there's a push poll, so we want to do something bigger with our kids. And at the same time, we also needed them. And that would be as simple as putting stickers right on the lip balm tubes or putting them in packages.

Renee

What Jonathan noticed is that we could actually not just put them in on those little menial tasks, that, yes, they could stick to papers together, they could file for us, but what about doing the things that they were already showing an interest in? So our oldest was interested in photography. He had a camera that we got from a relative and he was already using it, taking pictures and joined just taking pictures of things outside or his friends doing funny jumps on their skateboards or whatever. But we also had a problem that we need to solve. And because our product was online, we needed some decent photography product shots of our products that looked better than what I could take. And so since he was already getting good at that, we told him, well, how about if you will get some of the special lighting or equipment that you need, but you come and help us with this? So that was just like I think that's the first trigger for us to see, like, oh, we can involve the kids in the business. So he went to the camera shop. He got a little tutorial from the owner who said, well, what do you need these lights for? And so Jonathan's, our oldest, but our son, explained what he was doing and then he got a whole tutorial on how to do product shops while he was there. So that just went from doing some simple photography a few months later he was interested in doing videos. So he was just filming his friends. They would put these little productions on and he would have a little play. But he got better and better at all these different skills that we can pull and also use in the business.

Jonathan

Yeah, and I think that was a big moment, 'Aha! moment' too. It wasn't like one single day, but it was happening so fast. It felt like a single moment is that we realized that was the secret because kids have so many different interests and it could be all over the place and usually it kind of peters out or they go on to the next thing, or they want the next toy gets expensive or you start driving them around. And so we realized what the key here to really latch on to something that they can keep building that enthusiasm. So we didn't have to get him constantly prod him to get enthusiastic and not abandoned is by him delivering value for us. So he could see that it made genuine difference to us. He was behind the scenes, this wasn't about him. Our business did not talk about him. But he personally felt the impact of bringing value to us. So we said, well, wait a second, why can't we tap into all the different personalities that our children have? And Ben's right, our kids are very different from each other. I'm sure every parent says that they realize even though coming from the same parents, each kid is very different. And so what we did is we tapped into their natural inclinations and bents and we cultivated it in a way that okay, how can you bring value to us, first of all, eleven or twelve, and make a difference. And that's what helps keep that longevity. With a child interested in a skill long enough they can develop that sort of liftoff phase where they are no longer like in traditional music playing, people get frustrating to abandon their practice because they can't really deliver anything of value you can't get out of that phase. And so that's what we noticed is that if we can get them on to producing value, that in itself starts driving the inner motivation of your teams at that point. And the question in our conversations constantly with them is like, well, how can you deliver value to other people with your talent or your skill set?

Renee

And also what happens, especially with our oldest, since he was our first little guinea pig experiment, is that over time it became not just photography, not just video editing videography. Then he got into drones because that was he had a friend with a drone and he had a chance to use it. And he loved the fact that he could fly this drone around and then take video. And so by the time he was 16, by then he was able to actually do drone photography for local real estate people and all those little skill sets along the way. It was not just doing photography for us, but then he learned also other skills, just everything you learn in business. He's kind of watching us and he's learning, taking mental notes. And then he's getting better at his own skills because he wants to he's so motivated by then that he wants to get better and better at doing his thing. And he doesn't see that I'm only doing this, I'm only in the family business. It starts to separate out a little bit.

Jonathan

Yeah, he pivotal out of our business pretty early on, I mean, still helps us, but he quickly found out that he could climb the ranks as far as making money. And I think there was two things. One, we had a family friend that was a very good salesperson salesman, and he was on the phone a lot. And so I don't know who initiated, but we talked him into it. And he's like, well, I can teach our kids. I can give him some ideas on how to promote his business, but I want something in exchange. So he had a big piece of property, and I think my son went out at that time and did a lot of lawn care work.

Renee

But he got some cold calling experience with this guy.So our son's confidence, and he's only 16 or 17, was just through the roof by then so that he would go to the chamber of commerce meetings locally, talk about his drone business. And then fast forward to now, he has had the same drone business going on. He's self employed, but he enjoys training other people. So he's not the one out on the field so much anymore. But he's training these new drone operators and then he's figuring out all the tech stuff and how to make things go run smoothly and easily. And so with each of our kids, he's the oldest, but we have five out of the house. Each has very unique different skill sets, starting with how they could help us as a family. Or like one of them was a bladesmith, so he didn't really help too much in the family except marketing our knives. But at the same time helping the community help other people. And when kids start doing that, their confidence goes up. They want to learn more, and we're just kind of providing the environment for that in a safe way because they're not out on their own trying to figure things out at 25, trying to like, okay, I don't like this career that I just went to school for. I need to go pivot and find something else. But we're finding that start sooner, starting when they're under your roof and you could help kind of coach them through. That has made a huge difference.

Wendy

I've certainly seen the same with my children. My eldest actually came to work for me while she was on furlough in lockdown. It was purely because, who do I trust to do this task for me? And she knows who I am, she knows how I work, because she's grown up with me running a business alongside her growing up, it just worked to the point where it was one project for a couple of days and it turned into about 18 months, one day a week in the end. And it was just like, well, where did that come from? And she's gone on to go into a completely different career based on that first project that I gave her. And interestingly, when we were moving, we were digging up all sorts of paperwork from the attic and this sort of thing, and we were finding teacher awards that she was given in assembly for her writing skills, yet she was talented and gifted and talented for maths and art, yet the teachers saw something in her English and now she's a copywriter. It just goes to show, doesn't it, that by being involved, the value for her was a bit of extra pocket money, so that she wasn't just sort of treading water with her time. She put that money into finding out more and learning more and progressing herself more. And I think it comes back around to what you were saying, Jonathan, about value is it's got to be practical, hasn't it, for our children. They're not interested. If you say to them, oh, I'll give you pocket money, it really doesn't make any difference to them. But if you say, oh, well, if you want to go to the cinema or if you want to go shopping at the mall for some new clothes, I'll give you X amount to spend so you can buy that new top. So it's got to have a real value tagged to it than just the money.

Jonathan

A lot of times our sales are seasonal and so when I had a regular income and it was more of an employee, there's no time to wait for a purchase or not just based on the value of whether or not it's worth getting for the kids, right? But when we would wait for a sales camp, it's like, well, wait, why don't we get that what you want or need after the sales? And so that wasn't our intention, but it gradually taught them to respect money and hard work. And in fact, all of our kids, I think, that's become more visible and pronounced after they left the house, because their circle of friends always look up to them as being the initiators. They're not afraid to spend money, but also they're also not afraid to save money, so they're very much connected to the output of the work that they do, you get rewarded for. And that was one of the amazing sites and there are many side benefits and that was one of the very powerful ones, is that I think they're better money managers than we are. They started in with a clean slate, so to speak. And so we had those conversations always with them. It's like, okay, we don't have the money now, but if we do well with the sales and you've been helping us, then, yes, we can consider getting that skateboard for you. This is with the younger ages, by the way.

Wendy

And you've taught them to take the lead for themselves. Yes, it's that accountability and responsibility that often there's that gap isn't there, between them being children and leaving education, and suddenly they're an adult, and what are they going to do with that education? So being able to apply it to something really just sets some great foundations for them.

Wendy

And, you know, you mentioned your daughter being down to copywriting, and I think what's fascinating about that, one of the dangers of a formal education is whereas the content might be good in a particular course or in a particular class that you're taking, that's not the issue per se, though. That could be another problem, is that when you're good at something, you take your course. Of course, the next thing is, well, then you need to go to the next level and then the next level because you're good at it, but there's no connection to, okay, do I want to actually this is what I want to do for a living. Maybe I'm good at it, but I actually hate the mechanics of what it takes to deliver the value in the real world. And so people discover that way too late in life, whereas there's other things that maybe because of the way it's labeled or packaged, you wouldn't think that the person would be into copy work, but actually, if they could get their hands on it, not only would they be good at it, they would actually love it. And I think that's one thing we found out, too, with our kids, we have constant conversations, and we do hundreds of many pivots. So we don't abandon what we've done, but we're constantly pivoting. It's like, okay, what you did was interesting. You wrote these little stories, but no one's really responding to them. They're not excited about it. But you notice that maybe if you're doing announcements about an event, I'm making this up here, by the way, to see then you notice people are really responding to you. People say, hey, could you write this for me? And then the child might start discovering, you know what, I really like writing in this particular way, in this particular style. And not only that, people want to give me money. And like you're saying, you connect this work and effort to maybe extra tickets to the cinema, and that's just the…

Wendy

Reason and purpose

Jonathan

Oh, my goodness. The reason it's relevant. And so instead of you trying to crank up, okay, let's take this discovery, self discovery here in the United States, a lot of times schools will, in the classrooms will do some kind of self discovery. What am I good at? Oh, therefore I will be an accountant, or therefore I will be homeowner. And it's usually completely devoid of the actual mechanics of whatever it is you're trying to deliver. It's abstracted in the school, but it's not realistic. And you hear this all the time from middle aged men having a midlife crisis.

Wendy

I can only say that Alice, at 14, has just had to retake her options for her lessons, for her exams, and where she was at the school was a fantastic school, and they were very highly driven because they were exceeding in their reports and standards. Yet because Alice was kind of middle of the road and middle of the road kids, they don't shout up. They're just generally good. She didn't get the actual options that she wanted because the kids that were really good at those got those, even though she had a passion and a desire for those subjects and tried really hard. So the difference in moving to this school in Scotland was that she could choose. The teacher basically said, you choose what you want to do. And you could hear in her conversation with the teacher, well, I'm good at this, but I don't really enjoy it, and I really love this subject and I'm okay at that, but my grades were going up because I loved it and the teacher was great, and I just sort of went, hey, hang on a minute. You come to school, you've got to also enjoy it. It's got to be something that's going to gear you to want to get up out of bed every day and enjoy this, because this is kind of like the building blocks for work. You work hard at education, you work hard in work for the rest of your life so that you can live a life. And I can honestly say that her decisions and that conversation with the teacher just went that she came out and went, this is way better than I ever imagined, because she's now doing what she wanted to be doing. So I can only encourage any parent out there to… not fight. That's not the right word, but do what you can to be sure that your children are doing the things that they want to be doing.

Jonathan

Well fight is a good word. I think that is emotionally what it feels like, because there are so many you live in a social context and social relationship, school just being one of them. But everybody is like, how well are you doing? Right? So normally for a teenager, it's going to be, how well are you doing in school? And so it's a very set… You have so much English, so much math, so much history, and however they do it in Scotland, there but there's a certain measure. Right let's say your child is very good at a hybrid of two or three of those subjects. Well, it's not going to be measured. So now they could get very good at that and somebody were to artificially create and give it a stamp and say, okay, from ten in the turning to twelve every day, you're going to get a grade on this, your child could actually shine and be the best ever in that field because it doesn't exist. You're fighting the status. So you're like, okay, she's just so so in English or she's just so so in history. But maybe if you combine those things, she's the best copywriter or best novel writer that's ever existed. But you can't measure it as a parent, you're fighting that. You see the potential if you're paying attention or maybe if you don't feel like you can see it because they don't actually have the time to explore that and really go at it. So, yeah, as a parent, that is what you're trying to do is you're trying to sort of fight the system and it's abstract. That's what's so difficult about it, right? It's not like one teacher or your neighbors asking about, how is your child doing? In English, she's a really good copywriter.

Wendy

It's a massive institution, isn't it? It's very sort of set in its foundations of what it wants to gain and achieve and trying to move and change that. There's a big movement that I've just become aware of, which is social values that universities are really trying to sort of push, because even they're seeing that it's okay to have a teacher that says, how are you? But if that teacher cannot affect any change based on the response, what was the point of them asking?

Jonathan

You better not ask! For the value part? Is that that's the other thing. Is that's how you fight this status issue? I call it a status, you can call it what you want, but that social pressure is like, how do you know? How does your teenager know they're doing well? How do you know as a parent, your teen is doing well, right? Because if your markers are very institutionalized and you don't happen to fall exactly within those markers, which most of adult working life does not, then how do you feel that strength? Like, yeah, I'm doing great. You can't go around tooting your own horn, as they say here, but the one way to do that is to deliver real value. Once your team starts making money off, it could be a small amount, it could be just $10 worth once they start making that money. And people are genuinely saying, thank you for the help. So relatives don't count because they always say thank you, but we're talking people outside the family who don't really don't owe you that social obligation. It's like, wow, that was good. And so they come back for more and they come back for more. That's what makes the difference.

Wendy

That's another problem, isn't it, that they could be anything. So how do you choose and in lots of respect, by being able to guide them through what they are good at and what they love doing should really narrow and niche down that field for it to be easier for them to pick than what I want to be when I never grow up. That's also half the battle. At 14, she has no idea what she wants to be. At 28, she's just changed and never thought that she would be doing what she's doing now. So I can only imagine how many listeners are going, that's my family, all over and over and over. So how do we get better at this?

Renee

Well, partly it's about starting young and I think instead of saying it as a negative, I think it also is very positive that we can choose and switch. Because I think when I think about my parents, they stuck with the same job until retirement. You're locked in, this is what you do. And I think what an opportunity kids have in adults and even us. Like, if we decide we want to change to something completely different tomorrow, we can. It takes work and you have to know what direction you're going to go, but you can. And that's the beauty of having kids. Even your daughter, if she may be really passionate about something today, that might change tomorrow, but you can also have all of the resources to let her throw herself into some of these things and see where it goes. Because she might stick with one thing for three years straight and then add to it, maybe pivot a little bit along the way. But then she's only 14 now. Think of in the next four years what 18 can look like, by the time she's done. She could get our daughter, who is almost 21 now, and she's always been very educationally. She had a hard time reading. She was a very late reader. I felt the pressure, like, oh, my goodness, her younger brothers are passing her up. She hasn't learned how to read yet. They're learning. I would try again, kind of work with her along with the next brother. Coming up.

Wendy

Wth stereotypes that boys are always slower than girls.

Renee

Yes, it's complicated, but she was so good.

Renee

She would take a pen and paper and just draw. And what she could draw was amazing because we had so many picture books at her for her to just go through Wendy, go to the library and if we're just picking up books from the library, we made sure that the illustrations were amazing and so she just would latch onto those books and she would just draw. And over time she became an amazing artist. And the reading came late, but it came and then it came very fast and she caught up. So it was one of those we could have stressed and just kept going at the reading, which it just was not connecting in her brain at all. Or we could take that time and say, well, that's not her yet, so let's just allow the drawing and the illustrations. So now she decided she'd become a graphic artist and she's amazing with her art and she has a twin brother who is a coder and he is amazing with the coding. They are complete opposites, but if we had put them together at the same level, doing the exact same thing because they have these buckets of knowledge or we have to do this this way, or we have to finish this textbook, you have to do it. It would have been frustrating for one or both of them in one way or another.

Jonathan

They just would not have become very good at what they do. They would have just been that average, right? They fit in that average and they wouldn't have had a chance to really take off. And we don't know it by the way, when we do this stuff, we don't sit down at eleven, and say…

Renee

We don't project their future. In fact, she had more than one interest, as most kids do. She was very interested in horsemanship and learning how to train horses. This is again not our background. We have no skill set in drawing artists and music. That is not us, but our daughter showed these interests and so we had an opportunity also for her nearby to even develop some of the horse and shift training things that she did. So she was able to merge those two together. Sometimes you don't know what direction and she wanted to be the person who's like, mom, I want to be able to buy a horse, train it and then sell it. So in her mind that was her business idea and our mind that's not going to work very well. We don't have the resources, we don't have that's a different road to take. It like you're free to do that when you're on your own. But we did have the resources and she had the ability to actually produce the art. And so she went down that road. Now she has her own horse, she's off on her own. She's able to do that. And she's also saying that that's not really a money maker at this point. I mean, she could have developed that, or she could go down that road if she wants to, but it's a whole different road. But by the time she was able to leave our house, she was able to have the skill sets with the art because we had the time she could develop that.

Jonathan

Yeah. I think to add to this is that what will surprise you and this is why it's a simple answer to a complex way of how skillset emerges. Because you'll find that let's say your child has a particular bent and you're thinking, okay, his bent is this. So therefore he won't like, this other thing has nothing to do with it. It will surprise you, because when they start pursuing it, like in the context of our child with the drone, there was really no indication that he liked to public speaker do any of that. But because in order for him to go to the next level, he had to cross that bridge, he fully embraced it. And I think that's one thing, too, is that even if they're not good at it naturally, where they just sit down and just do it automatically, they decide, you know what I love so much, I want to do so much when I'm doing that, the effort to wrestle with it and go through maybe a moment of difficulty is worth it for them. So that's an interesting thing because in a formal academic setting, you'd be like, okay, I'm good at math, therefore I did well, I got A, or whatever it is, so therefore I'm going to have to take the next one. But what happens if you're good somewhat in this area, but you like it so much that you're willing to go through the pain of putting yourself in front of a bunch of real estate grown men and you do it and you're like, no, that wasn't that bad. But, without that interest and passion, you're driving you forward, they would not have taken that risk. So I think that's the organic part is that in life, usually it's a combination of skills together, and they learned that early on, that some things are worth wrestling at and doing. They make that decision. I mean, with some of our guidance, sometimes we're thinking, there's no way you're going like the horse flipping. No, we're not going to get stuff as an expensive horse and property. We don't have the resources for that. But otherwise they're willing to do things like get up early, like we'll have kids. Like, no way these kids will want to get up early in the morning to get started on it. And it'll surprise you. They'll be up at the crack of dawn they're so motivated and they're like, oh, okay. So you give them time to do that.

Wendy

And it's what comes through. I mean, we're talking on a very sort of personal level, but even down to business, because I do think that the two run so side by side that it's scary. And we're forgetting those values of where businesses initially strung from, which was that your dad was a farmer, so you helped out on the farm and then eventually you inherited the farm. It's those kinds of examples of being family run that when you're in it all comes down to self, doesn't it? If you're in flow with something, you'll drive yourself to do whatever it takes to stay where you live.

Jonathan

Yeah, that's very well put. Like you're saying. The one difference, too, for us is that we're not trying to clone our children to be like us as far as a business and so forth, but rather we're using our business, or in our case, we have that advantage. But you could do it if you're an employee, you can still find ways to do that. We're using what we control as an opportunity for them to showcase what they're good at or at least develop it. So we're not trying to get them to sell lotion per se. I mean, we can be opposed to it if they were, but we're giving them in the photography, our business was an excuse for them to test bringing value. And we had this in many different areas of our children. So as far as the business is concerned, they're not really visible on it, but they're in the background. And so anyone, including if you're an employee like, I remember back when I was an employee, I'm always worried about my certifications in that field. And then you have to put it on LinkedIn. I hated LinkedIn back in the days. Gotten better, apparently. Who's seen this? There's just a lot of pictures need to be taken of me. It's just like, this is not my thing. But if you have a child who is good at any number of those particular things, you can imagine that you could bring them in even as an employee doing stuff for you in the background. There's always an opportunity within your social environment. I'm talking about your immediate social environment. Friends that you know, people that you trust, they're all doing different things. And you can open those doors to your child to bring genuine value. So not the fake value, right? Where that's? A lot of times where people feel like when they're in these clubs and hobbies, they're doing things. Yes, it's sophisticated, but they're almost like party tricks. No one's really appreciating the value that's being delivered. So you need to find opportunities where it makes a difference.

Wendy

I think the final thoughts that I would put to that, really from both of you, is that when it comes to running a business, it doesn't matter what your passion is, it doesn't matter where your flow is going to be. There is always going to be elements of running that business that you're not going to like, that you're going to have to do a bit like going out into the world and there's people at school that you don't like or they don't like you. There's always going to be that peer pressure in any environment, but it's worth it if it's something that you're driven for. When listeners have finished hearing us trying to set the world on fire and get parents fires lit for their children, where's the best place for them to reach out and find out more about how you actually help? Because we've talked about the concept, really, we've not gone so deep into how you work with people in your business, but where's the best place for them to go?

Renee

The best place is parenttheirpassion.com and on that page we have a lot of information because like I said, it was a mindset switch for us because you're always looking for those opportunities. And so there is a free download and that can get parents started right away to have an understanding of how do you find those interests with those kids and where are the opportunities, what do you look at? Kind of opens up a lot more. One thing we like to say is, it's all under your roof. That's the amazing thing. You don't have to go take courses and so on. This is all under your roof. What you have for your kids to develop their own interest is under your own roof. And we teach you how to find those. Look in the attic, look in the basement. Not literally. So on our main page, there is a free download you can get and that will also put you on our email list, which some of the emails that we put out start to identify and show that journey that it takes for parents and kids to get started. And then those who are really interested, they want to get them on board. Now we have a $27 workshop for kids to take. So Jonathan and I are talking to the kids in short video snippets to say, okay, this is step one. Let's help you identify some of those interests. And then we take them through a whole, like a self discovery to see what those interests are and how they can merge them with other interests. And then the goal is to bring value. So that's where it goes from there.

Wendy

Well, $27, that's an amazing value.

Renee

A 50 year old can take it too. A 50 year old!

Wendy

You want me to figure it out now? I was quite enjoying not knowing. (Laughs)

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Wendywoo’s Takeaway

“The discussion between Wendy, Renee and Jonathan centres around the idea that children need to find practical value in their studies in order to be motivated to learn.

My own daughter found this in extra vocational work she undertook during the lockdown, for me.

So really, she’s living proof of the value that creating business opportunities within the roost can present!

Because she has since gone into a different career field based on her writing skills.

Jonathan suggests that children need to see how what they're learning can be applied in the real world in order to be motivated, and Wendy agrees.

Is it time that you sat down with your family and investigated if there’s something you can all do together to take the whole household to new business heights?”

Jonathan and Renee’s links

Parent Their Passion

Jonathan’s LinkedIn

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